Back-to-School Reading Recommendations: Some Childhood Favourites

I have always loved reading recreationally. However, during back-to-school time, I often found that I pushed aside my recreational reading so that I could deal with everything the new school year would throw at me. When I did make time to read, though, it became some of the most valuable time to me and I discovered countless books that I have loved ever since. I have compiled a list of recommended back-to-school reading, comprised of some of my childhood favourite books and series.

Encourage your kids to pick up one of the following titles (and maybe even pick one up yourself – a good book has no age limit under which to be enjoyed!) and make recreational reading a priority this school year.

The Doll People

By Ann Matthews Martin

What It’s About
This story follows a doll named Annabelle who comes to life alongside her doll family, unbeknownst to her owner, Kate. Annabelle’s life becomes more complicated when a new doll family, the Funcrafts, move into the home. Change can be something unusual to adjust to, but a new friendship and some adventure lie in store for Annabelle.

Why It’s Worth Reading
First published in 2000, this book is nearly twenty years old. Considering I first read it when it was nearly a decade old, I believe it is still very much a worthwhile read. It’s great for imaginative readers and anyone who ever fantasized about their dolls coming alive. The characters are charming, the plot engaging, and, if your kids enjoy it, there are currently four other books in the series to keep them entertained throughout the school year.

The Secret Series

By Pseudonymous Bosch

What It’s About
A five-book instalment, The Secret Series is just that: a series about a secret. It follows the adventures of eleven-year-olds Cass and Max-Ernest as they search for a missing magician, face off against a villainous chocolatier, and maybe, just maybe, discover the truth about that one mysterious secret that follows them for the course of the books.

Why It’s Worth Reading
This series was one of the most enthralling I read in my childhood. It was interesting, gripping, and I could never wait to get my hands on the next novel in the series. Unfortunately for me, I had to wait for them to be published. Fortunately for new readers, the entire series is out and ready to be enjoyed. These books would be fantastic for any young reader with a curious side, as I personally found the twists, turns, and resolutions near-impossible to predict. Plus, immersing themselves in a world as vibrant as this one crafted by Pseudonymous Bosch is a sure way to take their minds off the stressful side of back-to-school.

The Baby-Sitters Club Graphic Novel Series

Written by Ann M Martin, Illustrated by Raina Telgemeier

What It’s About
An illustrated reimagination of a classic series, these books follow best friends Kristy, Mary Anne, Claudia, and Stacey as they navigate the wild world of babysitting, and of course, the trials and tribulations of growing up.

Why It’s Worth Reading
This series is both touching and hilarious, and readers will find themselves rooting for these characters through struggles big and small. While the plot alone is wonderfully crafted, the beautiful illustrations bring the story to life perfectly and take these books to the next level.

School of Fear

By Gitty Daneshvari

What It’s About
Facing one’s fears can be pretty terrifying in itself. In this book, Madeleine, Theo, Lulu, and Garrison, a group of students enrolled in the six-week School of Fear summer program, find out just how terrifying it will be. These students must conquer each of their individual fears at the mysterious school where failing is not an option.

Why It’s Worth Reading
Anyone who’s ever been faced with a fear will be able to relate to these characters. I found the plot of this book to be unique and intriguing and I am sure young readers today would find the same. While I was very glad I wasn’t a character in the book and forced to confront what scared me most, I also found this book to be hopeful. Fear itself can be more harmful than whatever it is one is afraid of, and this book shows readers that we can all at least try to defeat said fears.

Dear Canada Series

By Various Authors

What It’s About
This series details different stories throughout and relevant to Canadian history, all told from the perspectives of young girls who lived through these events.

Why It’s Worth Reading
Arguably the most educational recommendation on this list, this series imparts a lot of important, historical knowledge to those who read it; however, that’s not to say these books are boring. In fact, quite the opposite is true! This series is engaging and written in a way that makes the issues feel relevant to young readers. I always found that when reading these books, even if I could not relate to the exact situations of the characters, I could relate to how they were feeling and I could recognize the importance of that piece of history. This series is also extensively long, currently comprising of thirty-seven books. The books are all unrelated, meaning that they do not have to be read in any specific order, so readers can pick and choose which titles interest them most. Or, if they are willing to take on the challenge of reading all thirty-seven, readers will be engaged and fulfilled by this series for a long time.

If you or your kids read any of these books, feel free to share your thoughts on them in the comments!

 

Holiday Reads

Give your students the gift of reading this holiday season by suggesting a good book! Here are some filled with holiday spirit that are sure to make your students want to write stories of their own:

  1. A Christmas Carol by Charles Dickens
    This is a Christmas classic that can be read every year as a tradition. As kids read the original tale of the the ghosts of Christmas Past, of Christmas Present and of Christmas Yet to Come, they too can create their own version of Christmas ghosts.
  2. How the Grinch Stole Christmas by Dr Seuss
    This is an all-time favourite! Most kids might have heard the story but not everyone has read the book. This book is a great reminder to be nice to people and also a good way to encourage kids to write, not as a school project, but just for themselves. For example, they can write their own continuation of the story on behalf of Grinch.
  3. The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe C.S. Lewis.
    The  first in The Chronicles of Narnia series, it is a tale of four siblings who discover the land of Narnia through the passageway in their uncle’s wardrobe. This is a great book to read over the winter break to immerse yourself into the icy, cold, mysterious kingdom that might leave you wanting to create your own fantastic world as well. How many possible adventures can we go on if we change the direction of the plot? Maybe your students can find out. An added bonus? There are six more books in the series for your students to discover!
  4. Charlie and the Chocolate Factory by Roald Dahl
    After presents, food is the next major component of the holidays. This book, full of candy adventures and the spectacularly sweet world of Willy Wonka’s factory, will set any kid’s imagination free. A big bonus is the tight-knit Bucket family portrayed in this novel, reminding students to appreciate the family time that this season brings even more.
  5. The Snowman by Raymond Briggs
    This book has no words, just breathtaking illustrations. But the lack of text should not be a deterrent to suggest it to your students. It helps them to think outside the box and gives them an alternative perspective on what a story can look like. Why not encourage them to create new storytelling forms of their own?

What other books are great for this time of year? Share with us in the comments.
Remember the Kids Write 4 Kids creative challenge is still open! One or more of your students could write the next Christmas classic. Don’t forget to remind your students to send in their stories.