Why Writing is Vital to Your Child’s Education

In the past 15 years or so, educators and parents have warned that budget constraints threaten to eradicate music and art education in schools. There are compelling arguments why that would be a huge mistake. Creative right-brain activity helps young brains develop, aiding in problem solving. It’s also a breath of fresh air for the more predominant left-brain.

However, in all that discussion, writing is never mentioned. I went to high school in the 1970s, in Ontario, and despite a well-funded school system that allowed for choir, instrumental music classes, and art classes, from grade 9 through 13, there was only one grade 13 class that was strictly for creative writing.

Notwithstanding the benefits of any creative activity, I suggest all students benefit more, in the long run, from creative writing classes, than from music or art classes. On a practical level, the ability to write concisely and creatively is vital to them advancing in their careers.

Put another way, being unable to write clearly, including poor grammar, sentence construction, and spelling, will hamper their career advancement. It will subject them to a kind of intellectual prejudice.

One could say that essay writing in high school will cover both grammar and composition, but many post-secondary professors beg to differ. Students arrive at college or university lacking basic writing skills and fumble through some basic freshman-year instruction. After that, colleges and universities don’t impose any writing standards.

Creative writing, as opposed to essay writing, allows students of all ages to approach the task of learning how to write in a fun way. It will encourage them to read more and it will stimulate that right-brain activity.

Quite simply, grade school students with superior writing skills will do better in high school. High school students with superior writing skills will do better in college or university. And on and on, throughout their lives, whatever their career-track might be.

Academic or business-oriented graduates will one day have to write compelling project proposals if they are to get ahead. More creative, right-brained graduates, like visual artists, will have to write their own proposals or express their artistic point-of-view in writing. Musicians who write their own lyrics will benefit from writing poetry. Even trades-people must communicate via email or through websites with their clients. Creative writing, as a fun way to encourage children to improve their writing skills, is vitally important to any student’s ability to succeed in life.

A Student’s Perspective on Homework: Necessary, Evil, or a Necessary Evil?

“Today’s homework will be…,” “We will complete the rest of this handout for homework…,” “The majority of work on this project will have to be completed at home….” These phrases, and similar others, are things I have heard on a near-daily basis throughout my time as a student. Like many of my peers, I also found myself dreading them. Homework is an integral part of any student’s school experience, mine included.

As I wrap up yet another school year, I am reflecting on homework’s importance. Has it been a necessary tool in my academic journey? Or is it an outdated, pointless tactic of academic evil?

Almost every student has probably thought homework to be a waste of time at some point in their lives, and I am no exception. I have found that certain aspects involved in the homework process require a lot of effort without providing much academic payoff. Spending hours gluing together a poster or trying to format a second line indent have not made me better at science or a more proficient writer. The formatting and assembly often involved in homework assignments are, quite simply, tedious, and not something that I believe improves my abilities as a student. What these experiences have taught me, however, is that seemingly tedious and futile work is often necessary in creating a finished product. Further, I have even found academically beneficial homework to be unproductive at times. In situations where I already have a strong grasp of the material, doing countless homework questions can feel pointless. These are the times when I find I have to decide how to best use my time and sometimes that means not doing all of those homework questions.

Homework has helped me to learn a number of important life skills. For most of the homework I am assigned, if I do not get it done, there will be consequences. Therefore, homework has predominantly helped me to develop time management skills.

When balancing homework for a number of classes, extracurricular activities, and personal and social obligations, I must prioritize and divide my time accordingly. In order to get everything done, I have learned how to be efficient. Further, homework has taught me to be responsible for completing my own work and has helped me in developing collaborative skills whilst working on various group endeavours both in and outside of class. Homework has also helped me to learn an unfortunate reality of life: sometimes, no matter how much you don’t want to do something, you just have to do it anyway.

Even if I don’t always want to do homework, I do acknowledge that it has consistently strengthened my academic abilities. In certain subjects, such as math, where you have to learn a technique or formula, homework can be extremely useful. The repetitive nature of doing homework question after homework question may be tedious, but ultimately, I have found that it does a fantastic job of keeping the information in my brain. Practice is a great way to learn, and in situations like this, homework is simply prescribed practice. In writing and research based subjects, such as English and history, homework has helped me to get a better grasp of the material and the world around me by taking a deeper look at it. In nearly every subject, from the sciences to the arts, homework can be helpful in becoming better at the subject, or gaining further insights into the information being learned. Ultimately, by extending my exposure to the subject, homework will help me to perform better.

In recent years, I have noticed that my school has put more effort into acknowledging and accommodating different learning styles. This includes offering different ways for students to complete assignments and teaching in multi-dimensional ways that target auditory, visual, and kinesthetic learners. I have noticed from personal, firsthand experience and through observations of my friends and peers that providing students with different, personalized ways to learn is immensely beneficial.

Homework can become stressful, however, when there seems to be more of it than hours in the day. I attend a semestered school and have to balance four classes each term. When you put together day-to-day homework, larger assignments, and the time required to study for tests and evaluations, the amount of effort required can really add up. In my school, and at most high schools, students will usually have a different teacher for each subject. Since the teachers are not responsible for the entirety of any student’s academic schedule, it is up to the students to organize their time so that they can tackle responsibilities from each class. As a result, the time commitment required to do well in each individual subject can be rather significant. Oftentimes, I have found myself having to choose between academic success and personal commitments, and have had to sacrifice time put towards recreation and hobbies in order to get everything done.

When I find the time to do my homework, I do reap the benefits. Homework has been a way for me to test-run my knowledge and abilities before evaluations. By doing my homework, I am able to discover where my strengths and weaknesses lie within the subject, allowing me the opportunity to get help and focus on the areas in which I need improvement. I do not always enjoy homework, but it is much better to find out that I do not understand a certain concept while doing homework as opposed to finding out in the middle of a test.

On the whole, homework seems to be a sort of necessary evil, something that can be a bit of a pain, but ultimately, is beneficial. The role of homework in my life has had a number of benefits, and has improved my skills and abilities both within and outside of the academic spectrum. I believe that like any good thing, homework is best in moderation. Take it too far, and it can become overwhelming, but get the balance just right, and homework is a greatly useful tool on the road to success.

Feel free to share your thoughts on or experiences with homework in the comments below!

Why The Library is an Important Resource for the Whole Family

In today’s age of instant gratification and Internet accessibility, a valuable resource is often overlooked: the public library. While the Internet is an undeniably wonderful tool, and yes, going to the library will require leaving your house, there is a certain magic to exploring rows and rows of paper-bound information “in the flesh.” Below are some of the many reasons why libraries are so important and how you can make them a part of your family’s life.

Libraries Have Books

Quite obviously, libraries have books. While this is common knowledge, many of us have likely not taken the time to consider the significance of having such a wide range of books available for free use. Libraries contain everything from fiction to non-fiction, classics to undiscovered hidden gems. As a result, these books can provide everything from entertainment, teaching a new skill, and information on just about every topic under the sun.

Libraries Provide Opportunities for Learning

The vast range of books at the library provides near-endless opportunity for learning. Be it an informative non-fiction book, a biography of an important historical or public figure, or a fictional story with an important message, there is a wealth of knowledge available at the library. This knowledge can be helpful for kids’ schoolwork, can assist us in becoming more aware of our surrounding world, or can guide us in the learning of a new skill. Does your child have a research project to complete? Take them to the library to find some original and fascinating information that will set their assignment apart. Are you or one of your family members looking for a new hobby? Peruse the how-to section of the library for some inspiration. Further, not only does the library provide concrete information, it can also facilitate the teaching of real life lessons. Learning to take care of, keep track of, and return on time their library books will teach children responsibility, accountability, and how to share.

Libraries Offer Entertainment

Books are often seen as a purely intellectual pursuit, and while reading is undoubtedly good for the brain, books can be wildly entertaining as well. The vast range of books available at public libraries means that there will be something there to engage everyone. You could even start a family book club, which is a great way to connect and reflect on what you are reading. Additionally, many libraries also have DVDs, so you could also select a few titles to have a family movie night. When you’re tired of flipping through seemingly endless and seldom interesting television channels, head to the library for some fresh and exciting entertainment.

Libraries Provide a Quiet Space

Today’s society is a fast-paced one and it can be difficult to find space to take a moment for yourself. Libraries provide the solution to this dilemma. They are quiet, calm spaces, accessible to anyone who needs them. They can be a great place to study, read, write, or work, and the serene environment will help to improve focus and productivity. Take the whole family to the library to work on homework, quietly foster personal creativity, or simply escape from life’s stresses for a few hours.

Libraries Connect Communities

Libraries can be a central part of the community they inhabit and provide a number of opportunities to get involved. Many libraries host various workshops and events, which are often led by or feature local talent. Getting involved in these events can be a great way to both learn from and give back to your community. Libraries can also provide various ongoing work and volunteer opportunities, which is a great chance for your older children to gain real world employment experience. Supporting and getting involved with your local library will help to make you and your family an integral part of the community fabric and could open you up to great new experiences.

The aforementioned reasons are only a few of many as to why libraries are still precious in today’s societies. There are endless ways that you and your families can make use of this resource and allow libraries to enrich your lives. Feel free to share below why you think libraries are important and what they mean to you and your families!