2017 Resolutions to Help the Whole Family Improve Their Reading and Writing

Every January is met with a variety of different resolutions, covering everything from personal health to self-improvement. Two months into the new year, are you still keeping up with yours? Take the opportunity to encourage the whole family to improve their reading and writing. As your kids hit the midway point of the school year, a New Year’s resolution could be the perfect challenge to revive their enthusiasm for academics. The follow suggestions are manageable resolutions that will help everyone–from the young to the young at heart–enhance their literacy abilities.

Take ten minutes every day to read or write

A little goes a long way! Introducing ten extra minutes of reading or writing each day is a low-commitment resolution, but sums up to approximately 56 hours over one year! This is a great resolution for kids to improve their reading and writing skills beyond the curriculum. Parents can take up this resolution alongside their kids to keep them motivated and have ten minutes of personal time each day!

Read one book each month

Reading an entire book every month may seem daunting, but it is doable! Pick books that you’re interested in, as you’ll be more likely to stick with a resolution that seems recreational. Encourage the kids to do the same! Monthly reading will be immensely beneficial to them academically and by letting them chose books that appeal to them, this resolution will also help them foster their own interests and ideas. Get the whole family involved by resolving to start a family book club. Every month, a different family member can select a book for everyone to read, or you can each read books of your own selection and share them in a monthly meeting. This will help your family motivate each other to stick with the resolution and gives you an opportunity to reconnect in a special way each month!

Write thank you notes

After the holidays, you and your kids likely have many people to thank. Writing thank you notes is a great way to get your kids to exercise their penmanship and writing abilities. Mostly importantly though, your kids will be reminded of the importance of expressing thanks and appreciation, which never goes out of style.

Write your own story over the course of a year

The thought of writing a story, even a short one, can be intimidating. However, by breaking up this task over one year, it becomes something anyone can do! Write at least one line each day, and by the end of the year, you will have a 365-line story! Challenge the whole family to take up this resolution, and look forward to reading each other’s stories at the end of the year!

Enter the Kids Write 4 Kids Annual Writing Challenge

If your kids are interested in writing, encourage them to enter the Kids Write 4 Kids Annual Writing Challenge! Kids from Grades 4 to 8 can enter their original stories and have the opportunity to get published. Entries are being accepted until March 31, 2017, and the full details of the challenge can be found here.

These are just a few suggestions as to how you can encourage the whole family to improve their reading and writing this year! The key to sticking with a resolution is to make sure it is achievable, so feel free to adapt these recommendations to fit your own lifestyle. If you decide to stick with one of these resolutions, or come up with your own literacy-related goal for the New Year, please share in the comments below!

The Twelve Days of Creative Writing Challenge

On the first day of Christmas, my true love gave to me…a festive writing challenge! The holiday season is in full swing, and while it’s a busy time, it’s also a great time to get creative. There’s something quite inspiring about the love, joy, and sparkle of this festive season. The challenge below is perfect for kids who have started to get restless with their time off from school. It’s a great way to keep them busy and stimulate their minds in an exciting way. Even better, the whole family can get involved, starting a new festive family tradition!

This challenge involves writing a short piece of writing progressively over twelve days. For each day, a festive word has been provided, which your child will have to incorporate into their writing. The piece can take on whatever form you choose: a short story, a letter, a diary entry, or even a poem–the possibilities are endless!

Words

Day 1: Celebration
The word “celebration” is a perfect fit during the holidays. What might be celebrated in your writing?

Day 2: Joy
Feelings of elation are constant throughout the holiday season. Why might your characters be joyous? Why might they not be?

Day 3: Food
It wouldn’t be the holidays without endless festive treats. What role does food play in your writing?

Day 4: Sparkle
The holidays are full of glittering imagery, from lights to tinsel. What sparkles in your piece?

Day 5: Wonder
It’s the most wonderful time of the year! What might be wondrous in your writing? Might a character be wondering something?

Day 6: Snow
Snow is one of the most iconic aspects of wintertime, and allows for endless fun. Is snow important to your characters? How might it benefit or challenge them?

Day 7: Wish
This season is certainly a hopeful one. Do your characters have something to wish for?

Day 8: Beginning
Approaching a new year means new beginnings. While it does not have to be the New Year in your story, what might be beginning in your plot?

Day 9: Sleep
During such a busy season, everyone is bound to get a little tired. How might sleep contribute to your plot? Why might a character want to or not want to, sleep?

Day 10: Giving
It’s fun to receive, but it’s rewarding to give to others. What might be given in your piece?

Day 11: Spirit
The term “holiday spirit” is often heard this time of year. What does this mean in the context of your writing? What does it mean to your characters?

Day 12: Family
At its core, the holiday season is about togetherness and family. How does the concept of family play into your writing?

Prompts

If you’re having trouble getting started, try using one of the following prompts for this writing challenge:

  • “It’s Christmas Eve, and Santa is sick! How will everyone in the North Pole come together to save Christmas?
  • Someone is trying to get home for the holidays, but they encounter an obstacle that prevents them from doing so. What is this obstacle? How might they overcome it?
  • Everyone has forgotten that it’s the holidays! Your main character, however, remembers. Can they convince everyone to celebrate with them?
  • What is life like for an elf or reindeer during the holidays?
  • The snowmen and snow angels that the children make during the holidays have come alive! What might they do?
  • Retell a favourite holiday memory in a creative format, such as a poem, song, or letter.

This challenge doesn’t have to end with the writing. Once the pieces are complete, you can have fun sharing them with family and friends. You could host a cozy literary evening, complete with hot chocolate and holiday snacks, where each family member reads their composition aloud. If your family tends to be a bit more dramatic, you could create theatrical renditions of each piece with creative costumes and props. These are great ways to spend time with your family over the holidays, beyond the typical dinner and gift exchange.

Feel free to share your experience with this writing challenge in the comments below!

Holiday Reads

Give your students the gift of reading this holiday season by suggesting a good book! Here are some filled with holiday spirit that are sure to make your students want to write stories of their own:

  1. A Christmas Carol by Charles Dickens
    This is a Christmas classic that can be read every year as a tradition. As kids read the original tale of the the ghosts of Christmas Past, of Christmas Present and of Christmas Yet to Come, they too can create their own version of Christmas ghosts.
  2. How the Grinch Stole Christmas by Dr Seuss
    This is an all-time favourite! Most kids might have heard the story but not everyone has read the book. This book is a great reminder to be nice to people and also a good way to encourage kids to write, not as a school project, but just for themselves. For example, they can write their own continuation of the story on behalf of Grinch.
  3. The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe C.S. Lewis.
    The  first in The Chronicles of Narnia series, it is a tale of four siblings who discover the land of Narnia through the passageway in their uncle’s wardrobe. This is a great book to read over the winter break to immerse yourself into the icy, cold, mysterious kingdom that might leave you wanting to create your own fantastic world as well. How many possible adventures can we go on if we change the direction of the plot? Maybe your students can find out. An added bonus? There are six more books in the series for your students to discover!
  4. Charlie and the Chocolate Factory by Roald Dahl
    After presents, food is the next major component of the holidays. This book, full of candy adventures and the spectacularly sweet world of Willy Wonka’s factory, will set any kid’s imagination free. A big bonus is the tight-knit Bucket family portrayed in this novel, reminding students to appreciate the family time that this season brings even more.
  5. The Snowman by Raymond Briggs
    This book has no words, just breathtaking illustrations. But the lack of text should not be a deterrent to suggest it to your students. It helps them to think outside the box and gives them an alternative perspective on what a story can look like. Why not encourage them to create new storytelling forms of their own?

What other books are great for this time of year? Share with us in the comments.
Remember the Kids Write 4 Kids creative challenge is still open! One or more of your students could write the next Christmas classic. Don’t forget to remind your students to send in their stories.

The Impact of Creative Writing on Child Development

The winter holidays are here and there is so much to look forward to: snow, presents, skating, a Christmas tree and creative writing! While it might seem that creative writing does not quite fit, there are so many benefits to including it into your holiday plans!

Research shows that there are many. A study carried out at the University of Sydney, Australia, shows that the development of creativity is fostered by five elements: imagination, collaboration, intuitiveness, discipline, and persistence, and creative writing happens to target all of them. The study points out that regular engagement in creative writing leads to significant improvement in writing quality, enhanced organization of ideas, greater ability for self-reflection, as well as increased confidence when working in teams. ( https://sydney.edu.au/news-opinion/news/2015/10/20/creative-writing-boosts-kids-confidence-and-creativity.html)

“In many schools storytelling and creative writing are not prioritised as much as they should be… These interim findings suggest that providing time for the creative writing process is imperative in every classroom. Strong creative thinking and learning skills are critical to students’ social and emotional well being, academic achievement and lifelong learning,” said Professor Ewing, the lead researcher of the study.

According to another research study conducted in Turkey, writing helps kids make sense of information while aiding in the development of important language aspects such as grammar, vocabulary, phonology, and discourse. (Lawwill, 1999; cited in Demir, 2013).

“It [creative writing] requires learners to manipulate the language in interesting and demanding ways in attempting to express uniquely personal meanings. In doing so, they necessarily engage with the language at a deeper level of processing than with most expository texts (Craik & Lockhart 1972). (http://ac.els-cdn.com/S1877042815008678/1-s2.0-S1877042815008678-main.pdf?_tid=07020a46-bf22-11e6-8a4e-00000aacb35d&acdnat=1481406534_74966573a4176b02bf317121233de5d6)

So maybe the best gift for kids and youth this Christmas is actually our 12 Day Creative Writing Challenge! Find out more on our blog and let us know how creative writing has impacted you, your kids, or your students.