Confessions of a Book Lover: The Early Days

As a self-proclaimed book lover, I pride myself on my love of reading and all things book related. When I was very young, my parents introduced me to interactive, picture, and digital books (I still have my LeapPad to this day). While I admittedly can’t remember an exact instance or moment when, transfixed by the jumble of words and illustrations in front of me, it became clear that this activity would become a lifelong hobby, I do know that I always felt strangely entranced by magical tales of beautiful princesses, handsome princes, and faraway lands.

I was constantly reading these picture books but, at the age of 5, I realized I wasn’t fully satisfied. While picture books painted vivid pictures of distant kingdoms and lifelong friendships, I wasn’t fully convinced that this was an accurate representation of the world; there had to be something more.

That evening, for the first time, I picked up a copy of The Wizard of Oz by L. Frank Baum, which was 154 pages long. Seated on the couch, with my mother on one side of me and my father on the other, I began to read it aloud. Throughout the story there was a constant clash between good and evil, right and wrong. Along with reading and discovering this book came a newfound feeling of independence and confidence in my ability to read. I started to look for more and more chapter books to spend my afternoons reading, digesting, and absorbing.

The transition, though, was not easy. To go from reading 15 to 20 page books to reading one that is 154 pages in length (depending on the copy you buy, of course) was a big leap for me and daunting at first. Will I even be able to understand it?

How long will it take me to read? What if nobody else is reading chapter books now? These were all questions that ran circles in my mind as I was making my decision. Eventually I talked it out with my parents and realized that the decision to read chapter books would only make me a more informed and better educated, individual—and who doesn’t want that! At that point, my classmates at school were also starting to explore more challenging books; some were even reading chapter books like me. This did make me feel more comfortable making, what I thought at the time was, a drastic leap.

Although challenging ourselves to read more complex, lengthy books is important, children do not transition from picture books to chapter books, never to return. We live in an age of visuals; picture books teach visual literacy like no other teaching tool and every child should always have picture books on the go. Picture books should be read from birth to adulthood, and nowadays publishers cater for this with a plethora of picture book choices for all ages and stages. I started out by reading The Wizard of Oz, but there are so many wonderful options to choose from to make your chapter book debut, and with this in mind I have compiled a brief list of some great books to check out:

The Wind in the Willows (Easy Reader Classics)

by Kenneth Grahame

Mole, Water Rat, Badger, and, of course, Toad of Toad Hall: these characters have captivated young minds for over a century. Kenneth Grahame’s classic cast of animal friends enjoy life on the river, hit the road in Toad’s brand-new cart, get lost in the dark, and have adventures in the Wild Wood. These enchanting and humorous tales provide timeless enjoyment for all ages.

Paddington Novel Series (Love from Paddington)

by Michael Bond

Told through Paddington’s letters to his aunt Lucy back in Peru, this novel written by Michael Bond offers Paddington’s own special view on some of his most famous adventures. From stowing away on a ship to working as a barber, Paddington shares his charming, and hilarious, take on the world.

Charlotte’s Web

by E.B White

This beloved book by E. B. White is a classic of children’s literature that is just about perfect. Charlotte’s spider web tells of her feelings for a little pig named Wilbur, who simply wants a friend. They also express the love of a girl named Fern, who saved Wilbur’s life when he was born the runt of his litter. E. B. White’s Newbery Honor Book is a tender novel of friendship, love, life, and death that will continue to be enjoyed by generations to come.

7 Canadian Books from 2017 for Middle-Graders

The holidays are always a great time to encourage kids to read. They have a lot of time on their hands and though the holidays are about spending time with the family, sometimes mom and dad just need a few minutes (like 2 or maybe 60!) to prepare a meal or relax. So here are 7 Canadian books, with varying themes, published in 2017 that you can stick in front of your children whether they are avid readers or not.

The list was inspired by bestselling lists, award lists, lists of the best books of 2017, and our KW4K authors. All recommendations are middle-grade reads except where indicated. Enjoy!

1. Knock About with the Fitzgerald-Trouts

by Esta Spalding (Author), Sydney Smith (Illustrator)
Genre: Adventure Fiction

This is the second book of the Dahl-esque series about the Fitzgerald Trout kids who have to fend for themselves as they can’t trust the grown-ups to do what needs to be done. Though this book is considered middle-grade, it seems to do well being read out to younger crowds as well. So if you have a child in middle school and another in elementary, this might be a good book for them to read together.

Book synopsis:

“Witty, full of heart and genuinely fun to read…a wacky, lighthearted romp.”–The New York Times Book Review

Welcome to the further adventures of the plucky Fitzgerald-Trout siblings, who live on a tropical island where the grown-ups are useless, but the kids can drive. In this second installment, the delightfully self-reliant siblings continue their search for a home. This time, their pursuit will bring them face-to-face with a flood, illegal carnivorous plants, and the chance to win an extraordinary prize at a carnival. Will they finally find a place to call home?

2. Shadow of a Pug (Howard Wallace, P.I., Book 2)

by Casey Lyall
Genre: Mystery

This fun detective story can be found on a few favourites lists around the internet and is sure to get kids minds buzzing with ideas as they solve the mystery along with Howard Wallace, P.I.

Book synopsis:

Middle-school detectives Howard Wallace and Ivy Mason are itching for a juicy case.

But when their friend and cohort Marvin hires them to prove his nephew— über-bully Carl Dean—didn’t pugnap the school mascot, they’re less than thrilled. To succeed, not only must Howard and Ivy play nice with Carl, they’ll have to dodge a scrappy, snoopy reporter and come face-to-face with Howard’s worst enemy, his ex-best friend Miles Fletcher. Can Howard deal with all these complications and still be there for Ivy when her life is turned upside down? Or will he once again find himself a friendless P.I.?

3. The Artsy Mistake Mystery: The Great Mistake Mysteries

by Sylvia McNicoll
Genre: Mystery

The Artsy Mistake Mystery is the second installment in The Great Mistake Mysteries series. It’s a fun read for parents and children alike and is especially nice for kids who are just a little different from their peers. This is also definitely a good way to remind kids that making mistakes is okay. (For more on what kids would love about this book, take a look at this insightful review.)

Book synopsis:

They say he’s been stealing art. But is Attila being framed?

Outdoor art is disappearing all over the neighbourhood! From elaborate Halloween decorations to the Stream of Dreams fish display across the fence at Stephen and Renée’s school, it seems no art is safe. Renée’s brother, Attila, has been cursing those model fish since he first had to make them as part of his community service. So everyone thinks Attila is behind it when they disappear. But, grumpy teen though he is, Attila can do no wrong in Renée’s eyes, so she enlists Stephen’s help to catch the real criminal.

4. The Explorers: The Door in the Alley

by Adrienne Kress
Genre: Mystery/Adventure Fiction

Here’s a book with a big sell that is sure to be a hit with your child. It’s the first in a series and has been optioned off to be turned into a Disney film. It has the excitement and thrill of adventure plus the wackiness of a free roaming imagination. It’s good for kids to continue to keep their imaginations active. And according to Book Riot, it’s an excellent book for reluctant readers!

Book synopsis:

Featuring a mysterious society, a secretive past, and a pig in a teeny hat, The Explorers: The Door in the Alley is the first book in a new series for fans of The Name of This Book Is a Secret and The Mysterious Benedict Society. Knock once if you can find it—but only members are allowed inside.

This is one of those stories that start with a pig in a teeny hat. It’s not the one you’re thinking about. (This story is way better than that one.) This pig-in-a-teeny-hat story starts when a very uninquisitive boy stumbles upon a very mysterious society. After that, there is danger and adventure; there are missing persons, hired thugs, a hidden box, a lost map, and famous explorers; and there is a girl looking for help that only uninquisitive boys can offer.

The Explorers: The Door in the Alley is the first book in a series that is sure to hit young readers right in the funny bone.

5. Masterminds: Payback

by Gordon Korman
Genre: Science Fiction/Mystery

Gordon Korman’s books come highly recommended from one of our KW4K authors, Christopher Smolej. Plus, this is the third (and possibly final) book in the Mastermind series so it’s a good time for the kids to read the whole series at once.

Book synopsis from HarperCollins.com:

The thrilling finale to the New York Times-bestselling Masterminds series from middle grade star author Gordon Korman. Perfect for fans of Rick Riordan and James Patterson.

After a serious betrayal from one of their former friends, the clones of Project Osiris are on the run again. Now separated into pairs, Eli and Tori and Amber and Malik are fighting to survive in the real world.

Amber and Malik track down the one person they think can help them prove the existence of Project Osiris, notorious mob boss Gus Alabaster, also known as Malik’s DNA donor. But as Malik gets pulled into the criminal world—tantalized by hints of a real family—his actions put him and Amber into greater danger.

Eli and Tori get sucked into even bigger conspiracies as they hunt down Project Osiris’s most closely guarded secrets—who does Eli’s DNA come from? With a surprising new ally and another cross-country adventure, the four will have to work together to overcome the worst parts of themselves if they are going to end Project Osiris once and for all.

6. Those Who Run in the Sky

by Aviaq Johnston
Age Range: 12+
Genre: Adventure Fiction

Those Who Run in the Sky is inspired by spiritual aspects of Inuit culture and is a finalist for the Governor General’s Literary Award for young people’s literature (— text). Sharing this book with your child is a good way to continue to expose your child to different aspects of Indigenous culture.

Book synopsis:

This teen novel, written by Iqaluit-based Inuit author Aviaq Johnston, is a coming-of-age story that follows a young shaman named Pitu as he learns to use his powers and ultimately finds himself lost in the world of the spirits.

After a strange and violent blizzard leaves Pitu stranded on the sea ice, without his dog team or any weapons to defend himself, he soon realizes that he is no longer in the word that he once knew. The storm has carried him into the world of the spirits, a world populated with terrifying creatures—black wolves with red eyes, ravenous and constantly stalking him; water-dwelling creatures that want nothing more than to snatch him and pull him into the frigid ocean through an ice crack. As well as beings less frightening, but equally as incredible, such as a lone giant who can carry Pitu in the palm of her hand and keeps caribou and polar bears as pets.

After stumbling upon a fellow shaman who has been trapped in the spirit world for many years, Pitu must master all of his shamanic powers to make his way back to the world of the living, to his family, and to the girl that he loves.

7. The Winnowing

by Vikki VanSickle
Age Range: 12+
Genre: Fantasy/Science Fiction

This is for all the sci-fi fans out there. Vikki VanSickle presents a fantasy/sci-fi world that the author herself heralds as inspired by The X-Files. But this book is also explores the themes of friendship, loyalty, and the courage needed to grow up.

Book synopsis:

In a world where the familiar has sinister undertones, two friends are torn apart just when they need one another most. Can they both survive?

Marivic Stone lives in a small world, and that’s fine with her. Home is with her beloved grandfather in a small town that just happens to be famous for a medical discovery that saved humankind — though not without significant repercussions. Marivic loves her best friend, Saren, and the two of them promise to stick together, through thick and thin, and especially through the uncertain winnowing procedure, a now inevitable — but dangerous — part of adolescence.

But when tragedy separates the two friends, Marivic is thrust into a world of conspiracy, rebellion and revolution. For the first time in her life, Marivic is forced to think and act big. If she is going to avenge Saren and right a decade of wrongs, she will need to trust her own frightening new abilities, even when it means turning her back on everything, and everyone, she’s known and loved. A gripping exploration of growing up, love and loss, The Winnowing is a page-turning adventure that will have readers rooting for their new hero, Marivic Stone, as they unravel the horror and intrigue of a world at once familiar but with a chilling strangeness lurking beneath the everyday.

Bonus:

Stock up on some stocking stuffers with these short reads by our Kids Write 4 Kids winners that are sure to inspire your kids to do some writing of their own.

How to be an Abbott

by Olivia Simms (2017 Kids Write 4 Kids Winner)
Age Range: 8-14

Here’s what award-winning author Karen Bass has to say about it: “A tale of belonging with unforgettable characters. I loved discovering How to be an Abbott.

Book synopsis:

Noah Thompson feels like no one really understands him. But when he meets Evan, he learns a thing or two about friendship, belonging, and family.

Summon The Magic

by Emily Little (2017 Kids Write 4 Kids Winner)
Age Range: 8-14

Karen Bass, award-winning author says, “Summon the Magic casts you into a fantastic world of imagination and adventure. I relished every twist and turn.” We think your kid will too.

Book synopsis:

For six teens in the small town of Hillside, the start of a new school year is anything but ordinary. It brings the discovery of strange powers, dragons, and a mission to save a whole other world.

Once your middle graders are done reading, if they want to do some writing of their own, don’t forget to get them to submit their creation to the 2017-2018 Kids Write 4 Kids writing contest. Submissions end on March 31, 2018. Go to this online form to enter.

 

Back-to-School Reading Recommendations: Some Childhood Favourites

I have always loved reading recreationally. However, during back-to-school time, I often found that I pushed aside my recreational reading so that I could deal with everything the new school year would throw at me. When I did make time to read, though, it became some of the most valuable time to me and I discovered countless books that I have loved ever since. I have compiled a list of recommended back-to-school reading, comprised of some of my childhood favourite books and series.

Encourage your kids to pick up one of the following titles (and maybe even pick one up yourself – a good book has no age limit under which to be enjoyed!) and make recreational reading a priority this school year.

The Doll People

By Ann Matthews Martin

What It’s About
This story follows a doll named Annabelle who comes to life alongside her doll family, unbeknownst to her owner, Kate. Annabelle’s life becomes more complicated when a new doll family, the Funcrafts, move into the home. Change can be something unusual to adjust to, but a new friendship and some adventure lie in store for Annabelle.

Why It’s Worth Reading
First published in 2000, this book is nearly twenty years old. Considering I first read it when it was nearly a decade old, I believe it is still very much a worthwhile read. It’s great for imaginative readers and anyone who ever fantasized about their dolls coming alive. The characters are charming, the plot engaging, and, if your kids enjoy it, there are currently four other books in the series to keep them entertained throughout the school year.

The Secret Series

By Pseudonymous Bosch

What It’s About
A five-book instalment, The Secret Series is just that: a series about a secret. It follows the adventures of eleven-year-olds Cass and Max-Ernest as they search for a missing magician, face off against a villainous chocolatier, and maybe, just maybe, discover the truth about that one mysterious secret that follows them for the course of the books.

Why It’s Worth Reading
This series was one of the most enthralling I read in my childhood. It was interesting, gripping, and I could never wait to get my hands on the next novel in the series. Unfortunately for me, I had to wait for them to be published. Fortunately for new readers, the entire series is out and ready to be enjoyed. These books would be fantastic for any young reader with a curious side, as I personally found the twists, turns, and resolutions near-impossible to predict. Plus, immersing themselves in a world as vibrant as this one crafted by Pseudonymous Bosch is a sure way to take their minds off the stressful side of back-to-school.

The Baby-Sitters Club Graphic Novel Series

Written by Ann M Martin, Illustrated by Raina Telgemeier

What It’s About
An illustrated reimagination of a classic series, these books follow best friends Kristy, Mary Anne, Claudia, and Stacey as they navigate the wild world of babysitting, and of course, the trials and tribulations of growing up.

Why It’s Worth Reading
This series is both touching and hilarious, and readers will find themselves rooting for these characters through struggles big and small. While the plot alone is wonderfully crafted, the beautiful illustrations bring the story to life perfectly and take these books to the next level.

School of Fear

By Gitty Daneshvari

What It’s About
Facing one’s fears can be pretty terrifying in itself. In this book, Madeleine, Theo, Lulu, and Garrison, a group of students enrolled in the six-week School of Fear summer program, find out just how terrifying it will be. These students must conquer each of their individual fears at the mysterious school where failing is not an option.

Why It’s Worth Reading
Anyone who’s ever been faced with a fear will be able to relate to these characters. I found the plot of this book to be unique and intriguing and I am sure young readers today would find the same. While I was very glad I wasn’t a character in the book and forced to confront what scared me most, I also found this book to be hopeful. Fear itself can be more harmful than whatever it is one is afraid of, and this book shows readers that we can all at least try to defeat said fears.

Dear Canada Series

By Various Authors

What It’s About
This series details different stories throughout and relevant to Canadian history, all told from the perspectives of young girls who lived through these events.

Why It’s Worth Reading
Arguably the most educational recommendation on this list, this series imparts a lot of important, historical knowledge to those who read it; however, that’s not to say these books are boring. In fact, quite the opposite is true! This series is engaging and written in a way that makes the issues feel relevant to young readers. I always found that when reading these books, even if I could not relate to the exact situations of the characters, I could relate to how they were feeling and I could recognize the importance of that piece of history. This series is also extensively long, currently comprising of thirty-seven books. The books are all unrelated, meaning that they do not have to be read in any specific order, so readers can pick and choose which titles interest them most. Or, if they are willing to take on the challenge of reading all thirty-seven, readers will be engaged and fulfilled by this series for a long time.

If you or your kids read any of these books, feel free to share your thoughts on them in the comments!

 

The Twelve Days of Creative Writing Challenge

On the first day of Christmas, my true love gave to me…a festive writing challenge! The holiday season is in full swing, and while it’s a busy time, it’s also a great time to get creative. There’s something quite inspiring about the love, joy, and sparkle of this festive season. The challenge below is perfect for kids who have started to get restless with their time off from school. It’s a great way to keep them busy and stimulate their minds in an exciting way. Even better, the whole family can get involved, starting a new festive family tradition!

This challenge involves writing a short piece of writing progressively over twelve days. For each day, a festive word has been provided, which your child will have to incorporate into their writing. The piece can take on whatever form you choose: a short story, a letter, a diary entry, or even a poem–the possibilities are endless!

Words

Day 1: Celebration
The word “celebration” is a perfect fit during the holidays. What might be celebrated in your writing?

Day 2: Joy
Feelings of elation are constant throughout the holiday season. Why might your characters be joyous? Why might they not be?

Day 3: Food
It wouldn’t be the holidays without endless festive treats. What role does food play in your writing?

Day 4: Sparkle
The holidays are full of glittering imagery, from lights to tinsel. What sparkles in your piece?

Day 5: Wonder
It’s the most wonderful time of the year! What might be wondrous in your writing? Might a character be wondering something?

Day 6: Snow
Snow is one of the most iconic aspects of wintertime, and allows for endless fun. Is snow important to your characters? How might it benefit or challenge them?

Day 7: Wish
This season is certainly a hopeful one. Do your characters have something to wish for?

Day 8: Beginning
Approaching a new year means new beginnings. While it does not have to be the New Year in your story, what might be beginning in your plot?

Day 9: Sleep
During such a busy season, everyone is bound to get a little tired. How might sleep contribute to your plot? Why might a character want to or not want to, sleep?

Day 10: Giving
It’s fun to receive, but it’s rewarding to give to others. What might be given in your piece?

Day 11: Spirit
The term “holiday spirit” is often heard this time of year. What does this mean in the context of your writing? What does it mean to your characters?

Day 12: Family
At its core, the holiday season is about togetherness and family. How does the concept of family play into your writing?

Prompts

If you’re having trouble getting started, try using one of the following prompts for this writing challenge:

  • “It’s Christmas Eve, and Santa is sick! How will everyone in the North Pole come together to save Christmas?
  • Someone is trying to get home for the holidays, but they encounter an obstacle that prevents them from doing so. What is this obstacle? How might they overcome it?
  • Everyone has forgotten that it’s the holidays! Your main character, however, remembers. Can they convince everyone to celebrate with them?
  • What is life like for an elf or reindeer during the holidays?
  • The snowmen and snow angels that the children make during the holidays have come alive! What might they do?
  • Retell a favourite holiday memory in a creative format, such as a poem, song, or letter.

This challenge doesn’t have to end with the writing. Once the pieces are complete, you can have fun sharing them with family and friends. You could host a cozy literary evening, complete with hot chocolate and holiday snacks, where each family member reads their composition aloud. If your family tends to be a bit more dramatic, you could create theatrical renditions of each piece with creative costumes and props. These are great ways to spend time with your family over the holidays, beyond the typical dinner and gift exchange.

Feel free to share your experience with this writing challenge in the comments below!

Holiday Reads

Give your students the gift of reading this holiday season by suggesting a good book! Here are some filled with holiday spirit that are sure to make your students want to write stories of their own:

  1. A Christmas Carol by Charles Dickens
    This is a Christmas classic that can be read every year as a tradition. As kids read the original tale of the the ghosts of Christmas Past, of Christmas Present and of Christmas Yet to Come, they too can create their own version of Christmas ghosts.
  2. How the Grinch Stole Christmas by Dr Seuss
    This is an all-time favourite! Most kids might have heard the story but not everyone has read the book. This book is a great reminder to be nice to people and also a good way to encourage kids to write, not as a school project, but just for themselves. For example, they can write their own continuation of the story on behalf of Grinch.
  3. The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe C.S. Lewis.
    The  first in The Chronicles of Narnia series, it is a tale of four siblings who discover the land of Narnia through the passageway in their uncle’s wardrobe. This is a great book to read over the winter break to immerse yourself into the icy, cold, mysterious kingdom that might leave you wanting to create your own fantastic world as well. How many possible adventures can we go on if we change the direction of the plot? Maybe your students can find out. An added bonus? There are six more books in the series for your students to discover!
  4. Charlie and the Chocolate Factory by Roald Dahl
    After presents, food is the next major component of the holidays. This book, full of candy adventures and the spectacularly sweet world of Willy Wonka’s factory, will set any kid’s imagination free. A big bonus is the tight-knit Bucket family portrayed in this novel, reminding students to appreciate the family time that this season brings even more.
  5. The Snowman by Raymond Briggs
    This book has no words, just breathtaking illustrations. But the lack of text should not be a deterrent to suggest it to your students. It helps them to think outside the box and gives them an alternative perspective on what a story can look like. Why not encourage them to create new storytelling forms of their own?

What other books are great for this time of year? Share with us in the comments.
Remember the Kids Write 4 Kids creative challenge is still open! One or more of your students could write the next Christmas classic. Don’t forget to remind your students to send in their stories.

6 Engaging Activities For Creative Writing Class

Making writing fun for a 4th to 8th graders is a combination of engaging their senses as much as possible and breaking down the semantics of writing into its smaller chunks. After scouring the inter-webs for ideas of fun writing exercises, I cherry picked my favorites to share with you. Without further ado, here they are!

  1. A great way to appeal to students’ creative side is to encourage them to write together.Already enthusiastic writers will encourage others and those who did not realise they cared will have a chance to shine. Give this game a shot to inspire teamwork in creativity: start with a prepared beginning sentence for a story, then divide students into small groups and ask them to complete the story together, with each person contributing a sentence. This will fuel their creativity as they have to build off of others’ ideas and get peer support.
  2. To focus on writing basics, you can try this grammar exercise with your students: write a sentence on a piece of paper, then circulate it around, asking each person to change only one word in it. Once everyone is done, read the sentence out loud. That’s right, it’s totally different! This exercise will improve students understanding of the parts of speech and their use in a sentence.
  3. Use technology to make writing more “cool”: ask the students to download a free app Next Sentence Lite on their smart phones, then divide the class into groups of four and have them create a short story together one sentence at a time. Have them share their creations with the rest of the class and together you can correct the grammar and sentence structure of their stories.
  4. Most of these are group exercises but of course students also benefit from thinking through ideas on their own, whether they discuss it with others before, after, or during the process.This activity works to encourage individual thinking: have students write a letter to a character and then reply on behalf of that character. It fully engages the students with the writing process and allows space for individual personalities to stand out.
  5. Trisha Fogarty’s Friendly Letters helps cultivate creativity through peer and teacher feedback. It is a more commonly used method of engagement that prompts students to give their classmates feedback on creative writing assignments. To assess a classmate’s assignment, students will have to fully understand the requirements–is it to learn verb tenses or avoid the passive voice? Students will also need to give at least two positive comments for every criticism they provide. All students will receive feedback from the teacher(s) as well. With this activity, you get the students actively participating in the editing aspect of writing; being a critic will help them pay more attention to similar problems in their own work.
  6. Another very useful motivator for creative writing is competitions. What can encourage a student to write more than knowing their story can get published for the whole world to read? The Kid’s Write 4 Kids creative challenge gives your 4th to 8th graders this chance! The added bonus? The winning story gets published both online and in print.

How do you get your students to engage in creative writing work? We’d love to know, so please share them with us in the comments below. Happy creative writing!

How to Make Reading and Writing Fun for Kids–Including Your Inner One–and Encourage Family Bonding

With back-to-school season in full swing, the age old question remains: how can you get your kids to read and write, and, more importantly, enjoy these activities? While technology can be a huge resource for kids, in today’s age of easy online fun and instant gratification, picking up a book can seem daunting for many kids. Luckily, there’s actually a number of ways to make reading and writing fun and enjoyable for kids. Even better, many of these ideas can also be used for parent-child bonding time, and you can get the whole family involved and enthusiastic about literacy. Here’s some easy suggestions that can help make reading and writing exciting for your kids:

  • Have a Mini Writing Contest
    Get everyone in the family to submit an entry into your very own writing contest! In this contest, everyone wins – give each writer a special award for something that was good about their writing (you can even take it to the next level with an awards ceremony and Oscar-worthy acceptance speeches!). To spice things up and help your kids expand their writing abilities, you can have different themes for your contests, such as poetry, short stories, or non-fiction. Even better, these at-home contests are a great preparation for an even bigger writing contest: Kids Write 4 Kids!
  • Put on Family Rap Battles
    What could be more fun than bringing out your inner rap star with your kids? Rap battles are not only extremely entertaining, they help your kids with writing, public speaking, and thinking on their feet!
  • Write a Family Story
    Play the part of a bestselling author–bring the family together and write a story. Everyone takes a turn to write a line (you can continue writing lines in turn until the story reaches your desired length), and at the end, you can read your literary masterpiece out loud! For an added dose of family fun, act out your finished story in a household play production complete with costumes and props!
  • Start a Book Club with Your Family
    Pick a family-friendly book to read each month, then have weekly meetings to discuss it! Before you finish the book, you can encourage your children to write alternate endings to the story which can then be compared to the actual ending. You could also start a family show and tell, for which everyone reads a book and then presents it. This will not only motivate your kids to read, but it will also be great practice for book reports and other school projects!
  • Play a Writing Guessing Game
    Get everyone in the family to write a short story, and have each family member select one of the stories by chance. They will then read the story and have to guess who wrote it! This game is a great way to connect with your kids and and stay updated on their skills and interests in a casual setting!
  • Turning Screen Time into Creative Writing Time
    After watching a TV show, encourage your kids to write a short story about their favourite character from the program. By having them write a story every few episodes, you can slip something educational into their recreation time without it seeming like homework!

The best thing about these ideas are that they are low commitment and easy to work into your everyday routine! Most of them only require paper, pencils, and a little family bonding time. Of course, depending on your schedule, resources, and your child’s reading and writing ability, any of these ideas can be adapted to fit your specific needs. The best thing about reading and writing is that there are endless ways to make them fun–these ideas are only the start of what could become cherished family traditions!

If you use any of these ideas with your family, or come up with any of your own, I would love to hear about them in the comments below!