An Open Letter from Last Year’s Kids Write 4 Kids Winner

Since I began working on Kids Write 4 Kids, one of the most rewarding experiences for me is the positive feedback I receive from kids, parents, teachers, and volunteers. Sometimes they are in the form of a phone conversation, but most of the time, it’s just a sentence or two in an email.

Last weekend, I received an email from Olivia Simms, one of last year’s winners, who wrote How to be an Abbott. After reading the email, I just knew it was something I needed to share since the letter wasn’t address just to me but to the Writer of the Future:

Hi Ivy,

I’ve been back in school for about a month now and although things have felt a little hectic, I can’t begin to explain how much the KW4K experience has helped with my self-confidence in dealing with new challenges (like starting high school!).

 Also, I put this together quickly. It’s a letter, not a blogpost…I just wanted to say something to this year’s participants.

Dear Writer of the Future,

Congratulations, you’ve found one of the best opportunities for young writers in Canada! Kids Write 4 Kids absolutely changed my life and I firmly believe it will continue to help kids across the country realize their writing dreams. But enough about me. What does this mean for you?

Maybe you’re doing this as a school assignment, maybe you’re chasing your dream of becoming an author one day. Maybe you’re doing both! In any case, being published “one day” doesn’t have to mean a trillion years from now. It can mean in a couple months. It can mean by the time summer rolls around, you’re a published author. And if you’re like me, those two words make your heart race and your head spin.

Though some people might question you, make you wonder what business a kid under the age of fifteen has publishing a book, let me tell you: you have every business. If you have a story to tell, you are no different from the Rowlings and Hemingways that came before you. Your experiences in this world are inexplicably unique, not because of the things that happen to you, but how you think of them.

If you take part in this challenge, please don’t do it to impress anyone but yourself. Yes, maybe your teacher is making you do it and you “don’t think you have it in you to write well.” But here’s the secret I’ve learned in talking to authors and becoming an author: everyone feels that way sometimes.

 Don’t just write what you think everyone else will like. Write something that you think is funny. Write something that you’d like to read yourself. Write something that changes the reader, but more importantly, changes you. Because if by time you submit your story, you’ve grown as a person and as a writer, you’ve already won.

What are you waiting for? You’ve got writing to do!

Olivia Simms
Author of How to Be an Abbott

Thanks Olivia, it’s fabulous to hear Kids Write 4 Kids has given you such a positive experience. I believe that it’s powerful for kids to inspire other kids, so thank you, Olivia, for your encouragement to this year’s participants!

About Kids Write 4 Kids

The 2017-2018 Kids Write 4 Kids Creative Challenge was officially launched on October 1st.  This will be our 6th annual writing contest for grades 4 – 8.  There’s still plenty of time for students to get started in writing a great story as the submission deadline is March 31st, 2018.  All the details can be found on Ripple Digital Publishing website.

Would you like a chance to meet one of Kids Write 4 Kids first published authors and win a copy of her book?  Safaa Ali, author of Why Peacock have Colorful Feathers will be reading from her book on Wednesday, October 25th at Indigo’s Manulife Centre location in Toronto. Click here for more details.

From Contestant to Judge

My Kids Write for Kids journey started when my grade 4 teacher urged me to enter my Pourqoui tale* from an assignment to the competition. The story was about a peacock who, through a miracle, gets transformed into the most beautiful creature in the world.  The book titled Why Peacocks Have Colorful Feathers.

Never in my wildest dreams did I ever imagine that my story would be adorning anything other than the classroom bulletin board, let alone the school library bookshelves.

Everything changed while I was on a school trip to Ottawa. While still in my pajamas, a student knocked on the door of the college campus we were staying at and informed me that my teacher was calling me to his room. Petrified that I had done something I shouldn’t have, I walked across the floor to his room. All of my anxiety evaporated when he told me that my story had been chosen to get published. With a large smile on my face, I returned to my room. Ever since that point, I wondered exactly how my story was chosen and who chose which of the incredible Ripple stories were to be published. This is why I was ecstatic when I got the invitation to be part of the judging panel for this year’s contest.

The chance to give children the same opportunity I had was certainly an inspiring moment. Although I didn’t meet the other judges, knowing that some of them had either won the competition or judged my story was very motivating.

All of the ten stories were judged in three categories – creativity of the plot or themes; the story structure; and the style and tone – with the percentages of the final grading varying between categories.

From the first story to the last, my jaw constantly dropped with amazement. After finishing, it was nearly impossible to imagine that it was kids no older than I behind the pen.

The stories varied in genres — from action-packed adventures to marvelous mysteries; fascinating fables to fabulous fiction — and were so good, they would make J.K. Rowling proud.

They say that a reader lives a thousand lives and by being part of the judging panel, this proved true for me when I go to experience so many settings, characters, and plots in a short space of time. I would encourage anyone to take on any writing opportunity that comes their way, whether it’s a homework assignment or a full-blown masterpiece. Who knows, you may find yourself on the shelf in the school library!

*A pourquoi tale describes the origin of something, creating a story to tell why.

How Kids Write 4 Kids Winners are Chosen

Over the last five years, I’ve been asked many times how winners of the Kids Write 4 Kids contest are selected. Let me start by saying I’m actually not involved in selecting the winner.

We have a judging panel that consist of twelve people. Of the twelve, six of them have been on the judging panel since the inception of Kids Write 4 Kids in 2012. They all come from different professional backgrounds – writer, marketer, lawyer, doctor, director, and a production artist. But the one thing they all share is that they all read a lot of books–as much as one a week–and to me that’s very important. You need someone who has read a lot of books to recognize originality and what’s consider a good story. The rest of the panel is made up of guest judges that changes year after year.

They consist of previous Kids Write 4 Kids winners, accomplished published authors, such as Karen Bass, Margriet Ruurs, and Joyce Grant to name a few, and people in the publishing or education industry. You can visit our website to view profiles of our recent judging panel.

It’s with this mix that I believe we are able to select the best story for the masses. To date we’ve published ten titles and all of the stories are very different, ranging from murder mystery, humour, fantasy, fable, and even a collection of poetry.

The judges don’t actually read all the entries, only the top ten stories. We have two very important ladies that go through all the entries to identify the top ten stories for the judges. They are professional editors that work for a big publisher so they know what they are doing! All the stories go through a checklist that we also include as part of the entries submission. Here’re story checklist items:

  • Does my story have a title?
  • Does my story have rising action, a climax, and falling action?
  • Does my story make sense when I read it out loud?
  • Are my sentences complete? Have I checked the spelling and punctuation and grammar in my story?
  • Is my story consistent? Are places, people, and things described in the same way throughout?
  • Is my story fiction or a collection of poems?

Once they have identified the top ten stories, each story is formatted in Times New Roman font, and blinded (that is, all author information removed) with only the title included, so that all the stories are presented in exactly the same format. This is to ensure there is no bias on whether this was written by a 9 year–old-boy or a 13-year-old-girl.

When all the judges finish reading the top ten stories, each judge rates the story online. The judging panel never meets to discuss the stories, so no one is influencing one another.  Each story is rated based on three criteria:

  • Creativity and originality of plot and/or themes – 40%
  • Story structure, characters, and setting – 40%
  • Style and tone; the quality of writing – 20%

All the scores are then entered into an Excel spreadsheet with a formula that allocates the percentage from each of the criteria to produces an accurate score. The story with the highest score wins and gets published. Over the past two years, we’ve published the two titles with the highest scores.

Official winner announcement is made on June 1st and it’s posted on our website. This year, the two winners are Summon The Magic written by Emily Little, a grade six student from Northport Elementary School in Port Elgin, Ontario and How to Be An Abbott, by Olivia Simms, a grade eight student from Glashan Public School, Ottawa, Ontario. We also post the list of runners up to encourage these kids to continue their writing journey.

As a not-for-profit organization, we are 100% volunteer run so all of our judges and editors give their time without any compensation. There are no words that can express our gratitude for their contribution. If you are a published author or someone that works in the educational industry and are interested in being part of our judging panel for 2017-2018 Kids Write 4 Kids Creative Challenge, you can reach out to me at ivy@ripplefoundation.ca

About Kids Write 4 Kids

Kids Write 4 Kids is an annual writing contest that celebrates the best creative stories written by grades 4 – 8. The winning stories are published both in print and digitally for the world to read. All the books are available at Amazon, Apple iBookstore, and Kobo. To support youth literacy in communities across Canada, Ripple Foundation has committed to donate the annual proceeds from book sales to that year’s winner’s schools. For more information, visit our website and sign up to be notified when the next contest start.

 

 

Experience the playground of the 21st century!

This February TIFF Kids rolled out an interactive playground for the whole family – digiPlaySpace. The theme of 2017 is Creative Machines, and the playground invites you to get your hands on robots, algorithms, and machines to build your own amazing creations! Take a look here!

Kids can control a robotic arm, learn to code and paint with light among many other fascinating things. The 23 installations arrived from eight countries to give you that 21st century play experience. It is a fun way to inspire your kids’ creativity through playful, innovative, and educational installations! And what better way to let that creativity run wild than create a futuristic story based on your experience? Kids Write 4 Kids contest is up and running, and your kids have until March 31st to submit their stories!

The award-winning exhibition runs from February 18 to April 23 at TIFF Bell Lightbox. Tickets on sale at tiff.net/digiplayspace and the details are as follows:

DATE & TIME
Start Date: Saturday, 18 February 2017
End Date: Sunday, 23 April 2017
Time: 12:00 AM

LOCATION & ADMISSION
TIFF Bell Lightbox
350 King Street West, Toronto ON, M5V 3X5
Information for GPS:
Latitude: 43.64665 Longitude: -79.39041
All Ages | Weekdays, $11; Weekends, $13