The March Break Literacy Race

March Break–it’s a great time to relax with your family, catch up on sleep, and make room for recreation. However, amongst the fun and games during a week off, kids tend to lose their motivation to accomplish anything school-related. That’s where the March Break Literacy Race comes in! This race challenges participants to complete a new literacy-related task each day, and offers opportunities to develop both reading and writing skills. The best part? It feels like fun, not school!

This race is adaptable to nearly anyone’s March Break schedule. Kids who are relaxing at home can challenge themselves when they start to feel bored with their newfound free time and kids on exciting family vacations can busy themselves when the beach gets too hot or the lines get too long. Encourage your kids to stick with the race by getting the whole family involved, or suggest they use it to stay connected with their friends. Kids can share what they read and write with each other, allowing them not only to develop their own literacy skills, but learn from others as well. Additionally, by challenging their friends to participate, kids’ competitive natures will kick in and motivate them to see the race through to the very last day.

Day One:

March Break is just beginning and the possibilities are endless! Being as creative as possible, write a short paragraph detailing your dream vacation. There are no limits on time or money spent on this vacation and it does not have to be realistic.

Day Two:

Read something non-fiction for fifteen minutes. It can be anything from a book, a newspaper, a magazine, or even a brochure. Get comfortable, find something that interests you, and focus completely on enjoying and absorbing what you are reading.

Day Three:

Find a friend or family member who can help you out. Together, you will co-write a twenty-line story. Alternate contributing single lines and do your best to work with each others’ ideas. Try to create a clear beginning, middle, and end to your story. The catch? You cannot communicate with your co-author in any way outside of providing your lines for the story.

Day Four:

March Break can be full of new experiences, so take this opportunity to learn a new word. Have a conversation, flip through a book, and look at billboards. When you come across a word you don’t know, find out the definition, and try to use it in at least two sentences throughout the day.

Day Five:

Teach someone else a new word. Sharing is instrumental to learning, so today, you will help spread some knowledge. Think of the most interesting word that you know, and tell someone who does not know that word. Share the spelling and definition, and show them how to properly use it in a sentence.

Day Six:

Read aloud to someone else. A great way to practice both literacy and communication skills is by reading out loud. Pick something that interests both you and the person you are reading to, and have fun playing around with things such as volume, tone, expression, and character voices.

Day Seven:

The week is coming to an end, but hopefully, it has been a lot of fun! Write a poem detailing your favourite experience of this March Break.

While this race is specifically designed for March Break, it can be adapted to any time off. You can make it an annual challenge, and compare the progress made on each task year-to-year. March Break is a great time for kids to improve their reading and writing skills, but oftentimes, that can be difficult to do. This race is both manageable and engaging, so it won’t feel like another tedious school assignment. When kids are faced with the inevitable, “what did you do over March Break?” assignments upon their return to school, this literacy race will give them something interesting to write about.

Share in the comments below if your family plans on participating in the March Break Literacy Race!

2017 Resolutions to Help the Whole Family Improve Their Reading and Writing

Every January is met with a variety of different resolutions, covering everything from personal health to self-improvement. Two months into the new year, are you still keeping up with yours? Take the opportunity to encourage the whole family to improve their reading and writing. As your kids hit the midway point of the school year, a New Year’s resolution could be the perfect challenge to revive their enthusiasm for academics. The follow suggestions are manageable resolutions that will help everyone–from the young to the young at heart–enhance their literacy abilities.

Take ten minutes every day to read or write

A little goes a long way! Introducing ten extra minutes of reading or writing each day is a low-commitment resolution, but sums up to approximately 56 hours over one year! This is a great resolution for kids to improve their reading and writing skills beyond the curriculum. Parents can take up this resolution alongside their kids to keep them motivated and have ten minutes of personal time each day!

Read one book each month

Reading an entire book every month may seem daunting, but it is doable! Pick books that you’re interested in, as you’ll be more likely to stick with a resolution that seems recreational. Encourage the kids to do the same! Monthly reading will be immensely beneficial to them academically and by letting them chose books that appeal to them, this resolution will also help them foster their own interests and ideas. Get the whole family involved by resolving to start a family book club. Every month, a different family member can select a book for everyone to read, or you can each read books of your own selection and share them in a monthly meeting. This will help your family motivate each other to stick with the resolution and gives you an opportunity to reconnect in a special way each month!

Write thank you notes

After the holidays, you and your kids likely have many people to thank. Writing thank you notes is a great way to get your kids to exercise their penmanship and writing abilities. Mostly importantly though, your kids will be reminded of the importance of expressing thanks and appreciation, which never goes out of style.

Write your own story over the course of a year

The thought of writing a story, even a short one, can be intimidating. However, by breaking up this task over one year, it becomes something anyone can do! Write at least one line each day, and by the end of the year, you will have a 365-line story! Challenge the whole family to take up this resolution, and look forward to reading each other’s stories at the end of the year!

Enter the Kids Write 4 Kids Annual Writing Challenge

If your kids are interested in writing, encourage them to enter the Kids Write 4 Kids Annual Writing Challenge! Kids from Grades 4 to 8 can enter their original stories and have the opportunity to get published. Entries are being accepted until March 31, 2017, and the full details of the challenge can be found here.

These are just a few suggestions as to how you can encourage the whole family to improve their reading and writing this year! The key to sticking with a resolution is to make sure it is achievable, so feel free to adapt these recommendations to fit your own lifestyle. If you decide to stick with one of these resolutions, or come up with your own literacy-related goal for the New Year, please share in the comments below!

Creative Writing Prompts and Challenges

Let’s face it: inspiration can be difficult to find. Most writers, old and young alike, have found themselves at a loss for ideas when trying to start a new project. Fortunately, there are plenty of resources that can help encourage writers’ imaginations. Listed below are some creative writing prompts and challenges that you can pass along to your kids to help them get started. These can be used for school projects, recreational writing, or to help them write an entry for the Kids Write 4 Kids contest!

Short Story Concepts:

Short stories are arguably one of the most universal forms of writing. They can be enjoyed by all ages, provide a temporary escape from reality, and often teach important lessons. Writing short stories can also be a great way for kids to develop their creativity. The ideas below are great for getting started, but feel free to encourage your kids to take them in different directions.

  • Write a short story about a typical day in your life. Now, imagine that you have a magic power. Rewrite your story about what would happen during that same day if you were able to use your power.
  • Your pet or favourite animal can now talk! Write about what you would do with them for a day if you could speak with them.
  • You are an astronaut who just discovered a new planet. Describe what this planet is like, and what you find there. Write about what you decide to do on this new planet.
  • One day, you wake up to find that you have suddenly become famous! Write about how this happened, and what you decide to do about it.
  • Imagine that you and your best friend have swapped bodies. You wake up to find yourself in your friend’s body, what happens next?

Week-Long Writing Challenges:

These week-long writing challenges can be a great way to encourage your kids to practice their writing. They are fun and spontaneous, so it won’t feel like just another homework assignment, but sticking with them for the entire week will be very rewarding. Try doing these challenges alongside your kids, as a way to boost your own creativity while motivating them!

  • Each day, write a poem in which you use a metaphor to explain something that happened to you.
  • Choose a different object each day of the week. For each object, write a description of it without ever saying what the object is. If you are doing this challenge with family members or friends, swap descriptions and see if you can guess what it is about!
  • Take on a daunting writing task by breaking it down. Every day, write one half page of a short story. By the end of the week, you will have a three-and-a-half-page-long story!
  • Try keeping a personal journal for one week. Write daily about things that have happened to you, your thoughts, and your feelings.
  • Create a unique character, and pretend that they are with you as you go about your daily life. Each evening, write about how the character differs from you, how they are similar, and how they would react in whatever situations you experienced that day.

Inspiration from the Outside World:

The best ideas are often hiding right in front of us. From the news, to popular culture, to our own backyards, the opportunity for imagination is everywhere. Encourage your kids to look for things that inspire them in their everyday lives and write them down in an Inspiration Journal. The following ideas can help them get started, and soon enough, they will be coming up with plenty of their own!

  • Choose characters from your favourite books, movies, and TV shows, and use them in your own writing.
  • Write a new ending for a story you have read or a movie you have seen.
  • Write a short sequel to a book you have recently read.
  • Pick an event that you hear about on the news. Use your imagination to continue the story.
  • Expand the theme of your favourite song into a short story.

These ideas are a starting point for endless creativity! The Kids Write 4 Kids contest is now officially open for entries, so this is a great opportunity for your kids to challenge themselves to write. If you or your kids feel inspired and come up with any original prompts, feel free to leave them in the comments below!

How to Make Reading and Writing Fun for Kids–Including Your Inner One–and Encourage Family Bonding

With back-to-school season in full swing, the age old question remains: how can you get your kids to read and write, and, more importantly, enjoy these activities? While technology can be a huge resource for kids, in today’s age of easy online fun and instant gratification, picking up a book can seem daunting for many kids. Luckily, there’s actually a number of ways to make reading and writing fun and enjoyable for kids. Even better, many of these ideas can also be used for parent-child bonding time, and you can get the whole family involved and enthusiastic about literacy. Here’s some easy suggestions that can help make reading and writing exciting for your kids:

  • Have a Mini Writing Contest
    Get everyone in the family to submit an entry into your very own writing contest! In this contest, everyone wins – give each writer a special award for something that was good about their writing (you can even take it to the next level with an awards ceremony and Oscar-worthy acceptance speeches!). To spice things up and help your kids expand their writing abilities, you can have different themes for your contests, such as poetry, short stories, or non-fiction. Even better, these at-home contests are a great preparation for an even bigger writing contest: Kids Write 4 Kids!
  • Put on Family Rap Battles
    What could be more fun than bringing out your inner rap star with your kids? Rap battles are not only extremely entertaining, they help your kids with writing, public speaking, and thinking on their feet!
  • Write a Family Story
    Play the part of a bestselling author–bring the family together and write a story. Everyone takes a turn to write a line (you can continue writing lines in turn until the story reaches your desired length), and at the end, you can read your literary masterpiece out loud! For an added dose of family fun, act out your finished story in a household play production complete with costumes and props!
  • Start a Book Club with Your Family
    Pick a family-friendly book to read each month, then have weekly meetings to discuss it! Before you finish the book, you can encourage your children to write alternate endings to the story which can then be compared to the actual ending. You could also start a family show and tell, for which everyone reads a book and then presents it. This will not only motivate your kids to read, but it will also be great practice for book reports and other school projects!
  • Play a Writing Guessing Game
    Get everyone in the family to write a short story, and have each family member select one of the stories by chance. They will then read the story and have to guess who wrote it! This game is a great way to connect with your kids and and stay updated on their skills and interests in a casual setting!
  • Turning Screen Time into Creative Writing Time
    After watching a TV show, encourage your kids to write a short story about their favourite character from the program. By having them write a story every few episodes, you can slip something educational into their recreation time without it seeming like homework!

The best thing about these ideas are that they are low commitment and easy to work into your everyday routine! Most of them only require paper, pencils, and a little family bonding time. Of course, depending on your schedule, resources, and your child’s reading and writing ability, any of these ideas can be adapted to fit your specific needs. The best thing about reading and writing is that there are endless ways to make them fun–these ideas are only the start of what could become cherished family traditions!

If you use any of these ideas with your family, or come up with any of your own, I would love to hear about them in the comments below!